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Party Safe for Guests (Printable Version)

Everyone wants to enjoy themselves at a party and have a night that they will remember for all the right reasons. This information sheet provides you with some key points to consider to ensure that you and your friends have a great time!

  • When invited to a party, don’t spread the invitation to other people.  Do not use the Internet, SMS, e-mail distribution lists, online notice boards, social networking sites or word of mouth to advertise the party.

  • Don’t take your own alcohol to the party, unless requested by the host.  Take along an extra bottle of soft drink or juice instead!

  • If you are drinking alcohol, it is a good idea to take sips not gulps, finish each drink before you have another and don’t let others top-up your drinks so you know how much you are drinking.  

  • Remember its ok to say no if friends offer you more alcohol than you had planned to drink.

  • Have some food, non-alcoholic drinks and get involved with the entertainment on offer at the party, like dancing.  You will drink less alcohol and still have a fantastic time. 

  • Look after your friends during the party and stay with people you know and trust.  Be aware of what is happening around you, be confident and assertive and if you pick up ‘bad vibes’ from someone or someplace trust your instincts and head for somewhere safe.

  • Watch your drinks and your friends’ drinks to ensure no one tampers with them.

  • If your friends are getting drunk get them to slow down drinking or offer them non-alcoholic drinks.  If your friends are drunk think about getting them to sit down so they don’t hurt themselves, prevent them from drinking any more, keep an eye on them and get them home safely.

  • If a person is drunk and has or looks like they may pass out or collapse, contact a doctor or call an ambulance immediately.  While waiting for the ambulance, lay the person on their side in the ‘recovery’ position to maintain their airway and stay with them.

  • Remember, police can be called to a party if they receive complaints about excessive noise or the conduct of guests, if the party gets out of hand or if it comes to the attention of police that an offence is being committed.  Comply with any directions given to you by police; if you fail to do so you are committing an offence and, if charged and convicted, you could face a significant fine or prison sentence.

  • Alcohol and other drugs (including prescription drugs) affect every person differently.  Remember, alcohol and other drugs can interact with each other, which can amplify their effects, increase the risk of overdose or result in adverse or unpredictable reactions.

  • Make plans beforehand about how you and your friends will get home after the party.   Arrange for a lift with a non-drinking driver, taxi or public transport.

  • If you are driving to the party, car pool with a few friends and decide who will be the designated driver before you leave for the party.  The designated driver should not drink any alcohol at the party so that you all get home safely.

  • Make plans beforehand about how you and your friends will get home after the party.   Arrange for a lift with a non-drinking driver, taxi or public transport.

  • Don’t get into a car with a driver who has been drinking or using drugs. 

  • Never walk home alone.

  • Remember that young people, like adults, can be arrested for behaviours associated with drinking (such as violence or property damage).

  • It is illegal to drink alcohol in a public place (including a park or beach) and you could be fined or arrested.

  • It is a criminal offence to be in possession of illicit drugs including cannabis, and could result in a fine or prison sentence if you are charged and convicted.  Not to mention that you could end up with a criminal record for the rest of your life that could impact your future job prospects and travel opportunities.

  • It is an offence to supply alcohol to a person under 18 in a public place.  If you are caught supplying alcohol to a person under 18 in a public place you could be slapped with an on-the-spot fine or have to attend court, where maximum penalties can apply. 

  • If you are asked by the party host or organiser to leave the party, leave immediately without incident.  You may commit an offence if you cause, or contribute, to a party becoming out-of-control because of your out-of-control conduct.  Out-of-control conduct includes things like trespassing, damaging property, disorderly conduct, fighting, doing obscene acts, making unreasonably noise, throwing objects to harm people, obstructing traffic, being drunk, consuming or possessing alcohol in a public place or breaking glass.  If charged and convicted you could face a significant fine, prison sentence and you could be ordered by the court to contribute to any costs incurred by police in responding to the out-of-control event. 

  • It is an offence to supply alcohol to a person under 18 on private property unless you are a responsible adult for that minor (i.e., a parent, step-parent or guardian of the minor, or an adult who has parental rights and responsibilities for the minor) and the supply of alcohol is not irresponsible.  If police are called to a party and see irresponsible supply of alcohol and people under 18 years of age not being responsibly supervised then the police may seize all alcohol and if you supplied the alcohol you could be facing a substantial fine.

  • Drinking alcohol or taking drugs affects your ability to make safe decisions.  It is better for you to stay in control, so you can make the right choices for you.

  • If a person is drunk and has or looks like they may pass out or collapse, contact a doctor or call an ambulance immediately.  While waiting for the ambulance, lay the person on their side in the ‘recovery’ position to maintain their airway and stay with them.

  • Contact your local police IMMEDIATELY should trouble occur. REMEMBER in an EMERGENCY call Triple Zero(000).

  • For more information on the relevant legislation and offences see the Out-of-control events information sheet​​​